A Better Way to Do Multifactor Authentication with Authentify xFA

xFA can add multifactor security to any web service with a few lines of code. We tested xFA on a small network in August 2014. It has cloud-based components to manage multifactor security, along with apps for iOS and Android.

Price: $19.95 per user per year

http://info.authentify.com/authentify-xfa-screencast

Fingerprint authenticators for iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy are expected for the near future.

Network World: Citrix Xen Mobile rates a spot on your MDM short list

xen phone security optionsWhen we reviewed six mobile device management products for Network World back in 2013, Citrix declined the opportunity to participate, but the company has changed its mind with the recent release of Xen Mobile v9.0 MDM. In our testing, we found that the software stacks up nicely against AirWatch and Good Technology, the two leaders from that review, and should be on any IT manager’s short list, particularly if you already use other Citrix connectivity products. (A view of its extensive security options can be seen on the right.)

You can read my review today in Network World here.

Computerworld: Peak vs. Tibbr, two communication tools reviewed

peak activity graphs1If you are trying to have more effective team communications, you are probably looking at products or services that go by names like “social CRMs” or “team engagement tracking apps.” Regardless of what they are called, these apps can connect to a variety of social networks and email accounts and make it easier to manage your communications, track what your team has posted, understand what other team members are working on and improve workflows and productivity by avoiding interruptions or massive amounts of email.

I tried out two of these tools, Peak (shown above) and Tibbr. Both are browser-based: Tibbr also has mobile and desktop clients. You can read my review in Computerworld here.

Network World: How Aryaka’s global private network speeds access to Internet apps

arayIf you are trying to improve global access to your applications, you have probably considered one of several solutions: stringing together your own private network, purchasing WAN optimization appliances, or using a managed cloud-based service provider. Figuring out the benefits of each solution isn’t easy and it is hard to test for variations in Internet connectivity, specific applications and other conditions.

But what if a vendor could show you exactly the benefit in a particular use case, so you could understand what they are delivering? I got Aryaka to do just that. You can read my post in Network World today here.

Computerworld: Working together: 3 new team collaboration tools, Glip, Flow, and Slingshot

The concept of how we collaborate is changing. Better tools are being developed that help workgroups put together documents, quickly schedule meetings and chat with each other. Today’s collaboration environment includes tools for text chats, bulletin boards, video conferencing, screen sharing and scheduling meetings. Among these are a number of lightweight products that offer quick and near-real time collaboration. I looked at three of the newcomers: Flow, Glip and Slingshot. (A screen from Flow is pictured above.)

While all have some things in common — all three seek to enable collaboration and can be used either on desktops/laptops or on mobile devices — they all do somewhat different things in the collaboration space.

You can read my review that appeared in Computerworld here.

NComputing’s oneSpace improves tablet productivity

NComputing’s oneSpace combines the benefits of tablet style navigation and gestures with fully functioning Windows and SaaS applications, internal web apps and portals, and on-premises and cloud file shares in a single policy-controlled environment that is secure and separate from a user’s personal tablet apps. We tested it on both Android and iOS tablets in June 2014.

Usage of the oneSpace app requires a license to a oneSpace service.

Price: $33/user/month

http://ncomputing.com

Network World: Unisys unveils invisibility cloak for network traffic

unisys stealth advantages2If you are ultra paranoid, what could be better than hiding your network traffic in such a way that no one could possibly intercept it? This is what Unisys is offering with its new Stealth appliance, which could make man-in-the-middle attacks and keylogger exploits obsolete, or at least more difficult to mount.

Stealth uses four layers of security (see diagram): each packet is encrypted with AES256, then split into three separate pieces and dispersed across the network, destined for a particular group of users that have to be running its protocols. Stealth has been around since 2005, and you can read my review of Stealth for Network World here.